Syria Travel Guide
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Syria Tourism:
Damascus
Aleppo
Krak des Chevaliers
Palmyra
Bosra
Dead Cities
Hama
Qala'at Samaan

Syria Directory & Syria Travel Information

Syria History
Eblan Civilization
Antiquity and early Christian Era
Islamic Era
Ottoman Era
French Mandate
Instability & Foreign Relations: Independence to 1967
Six Day War and Aftermath
Baath Party Rule Under Hafezc Al-Assad,1970-2000
21st Century

Syrian Territorial Problems:
Turkish-Syrian Dispute Over Iskandaron Province
Israeli Annexation of the Golan Heights

Syria Etymology
Syria Politics
Syria Constitution & Government
Syria Human Rights
Syria Emergency Law
Syria Administrative Divisions
Syria Geography
Syria Economy
Foreign Trade

Transport
Syria Demographics
Syria Ethnic Groups
Syria Religion
Syria Languages
Education in Syria
Syria Military
Syria Culture
Music of Syria
Syrian Literature


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Syria Travel Guide

Trip Holidays Syria offers travel tips and information for top travel places and best destinations. We feature links, resources and large selection of budget airlines, chartered planes, sea cruises, ferries, travel agencies, land transports and attractions including beaches, medical tourism, retirement homes, historical and pilgrimage tours.


Syria History - Instability and Foreign Relations: Independence to 1967

Although rapid economic development followed the declaration of independence, Syrian politics from independence through the late 1960s were marked by upheaval. Between 1946 and 1956, Syria had 20 different cabinets and drafted four separate constitutions. In 1948, Syria was involved in the Arab-Israeli War, aligning with the other local Arab nations who were attempting to prevent the establishment of Israel. The Syrian army was pressed out of most of the Israel area, but fortified their strongholds on the Golan Heights and managed to keep their old borders and some additional territory.

The humiliating defeat suffered by the army was one of several trigger factors for Col. Husni al-Za'im's seizure of power in 1949, in what has been described as the first military coup d'état of the Arab world. since the start of the Second World War. This was soon followed by a new coup, by Col. Sami al-Hinnawi, who was then himself quickly deposed by Col. Adib Shishakli, all within the same year. After exercising influence behind the scenes for some time, dominating the ravaged parliamentary scene, Shishakli launched a second coup in 1951, entrenching his rule and eventually abolishing multipartyism altogether. Only when president Shishakli was himself overthrown in a 1954 coup, was the parliamentary system restored, but it was fundamentally undermined by continued political maneuvering supported by competing factions in the military. By this time, civilian politics had been largely gutted of meaning, and power was increasingly concentrated in the military and security establishment, which had now proven itself to be the only force capable of seizing and - perhaps - keeping power. Parliamentary institutions remained weak and ineffectual, dominated by competing parties representing the landowning elites and various Sunni urban notables, while economy and politics were mismanaged, and little done to better the role of Syria's peasant majority. This, as well as the influence of Nasserism and other anti-colonial ideologies, created fertile ground for various Arab nationalist, Syrian nationalist and socialist movements, who represented disaffected elements of society, notably including the religious minorities, and demanded radical reform.

During the Suez Crisis of 1956, after the invasion of the Sinai Peninsula by Israeli troops, and the intervention of British and French troops, martial law was declared in Syria. The November 1956 attacks on Iraqi pipelines were in retaliation for Iraq's acceptance into the Baghdad Pact. In early 1957 Iraq advised Egypt and Syria against a conceivable takeover of Jordan.

In November 1956 Syria signed a pact with the Soviet Union, providing a foothold for Communist influence within the government in exchange for planes, tanks, and other military equipment being sent to Syria. With this increase in the strength of Syrian military technology worried Turkey, as it seemed feasible that Syria might attempt to retake Iskenderun, a matter of dispute between Syria and Turkey. On the other hand, Syria and the U.S.S.R. accused Turkey of massing its troops at the Syrian border. During this standoff, Communists gained more control over the Syrian government and military. Only heated debates in the United Nations lessened the threat of war.

Syria's political instability during the years after the 1954 coup, the parallelism of Syrian and Egyptian policies, and the appeal of Egyptian President Gamal Abdal Nasser's leadership in the wake of the Suez crisis created support in Syria for union with Egypt. On 1 February 1958, Syrian president Shukri al-Quwatli and Nasser announced the merging of the two countries, creating the United Arab Republic, and all Syrian political parties, as well as the Communists therein, ceased overt activities.

The union was not a success, however. Following a military coup on 28 September 1961, Syria seceded, reestablishing itself as the Syrian Arab Republic. Instability characterized the next 18 months, with various coups culminating on 8 March 1963, in the installation by leftist Syrian Army officers of the National Council of the Revolutionary Command, a group of military and civilian officials who assumed control of all executive and legislative authority. The takeover was engineered by members of the Arab Socialist Resurrection Party, which had been active in Syria and other Arab countries since the late 1940s. The new cabinet was dominated by Baath members.

The Baath takeover in Syria followed a Baath coup in Iraq the previous month. The new Syrian Government explored the possibility of federation with Egypt and with Baath-controlled Iraq. An agreement was concluded in Cairo on 17 April 1963, for a referendum on unity to be held in September 1963. However, serious disagreements among the parties soon developed, and the tripartite federation failed to materialize. Thereafter, the Baath government in Syria and Iraq began to work for bilateral unity. These plans foundered in November 1963, when the Baath government in Iraq was overthrown. In May 1964, President Amin Hafiz of the NCRC promulgated a provisional constitution providing for a National Council of the Revolution, an appointed legislature composed of representatives of mass organizations—labour, peasant, and professional unions—a presidential council, in which executive power was vested, and a cabinet. On 23 February 1966, a group of army officers carried out a successful, intra-party coup, imprisoned President Hafiz, dissolved the cabinet and the NCR, abrogated the provisional constitution, and designated a regionalist, civilian Baath government on 1 March. The coup leaders described it as a "rectification" of Baath Party principles.


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Syria Travel Informations and Jordan Travel Guide
Syria Etymology - Syria Politics: Constitution & Government - Human Rights - Emergency Law - Syria Administrative Divisions
Syria Geography - Syria Economy: Foreign Trade - Transport - Syria Demographics - Syria Ethnic Groups - Syria Religion
Syria Languages - Education in Syria - Syria Military - Syria Culture - Music of Syria - Syrian Literature

Syria History: Eblan civilization - Antiquity and early Christian era - Islamic era - Ottoman Era
French Mandate - Instability and Foreign Relations: Independence to 1967 - Six Day War and Aftermath
Baath Party Rule Under Hafezc Al-Assad, 1970-2000 - 21st Century
Syrian Territorial Problems: Turkish-Syrian Dispute Over Iskandaron Province - Israeli Annexation of the Golan Heights

Syria Tourism
Syria Tourist Attractions: Damascus - Aleppo - Krak des Chevaliers - Palmyra - Bosra
Dead Cities - Hama - Qala'at Samaan

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